Talk To Frank resources-for-family

What Is Talk To Frank?

Converse with Frank is the extensive running anti-drug movement the UK has had. But has it actually worked and stopped drug use?

A decade ago a police SWAT team slammed into a peaceful kitchen somewhere in the suburbs and modified the image of drugs education in the United Kingdom for always. The doom and gloom teachings coupled with pushing to keep away from the drug pushers who are everywhere was thrown out. In came strange humour and a light, yet energetic approach.


The first advert presented an adolescent inviting the police to come and arrest his mum because the mum wanted them to talk about drugs. The message delivered by the advert had not been heard before either "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank A Pleasant Private Drug Counsel

Thought up by promotion organization Mother, Frank was, indeed, the new name for the National Drugs Helpline. It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. The quests of Pablo, the dog that's used as a substance mule, to a tour around a brain warehouse have been put forward under the Frank name, making it a well-known trade name amongst the youth of the nation.


According to Justin Tindall, creative director of Leo Burnett ad agency, the most important thing is that no one could accuse frank of trying to be "down with the kids," or coming out with the wrong attire. Even the sham Frank videos on YouTube are moderately deferential. Also, there's no sign that Frank is a government agent - something that is rare in the history of campaigns paid for by government.

Education about drug has come a long way since Nancy Reagan and the UK cast of Grange Hill told kids to "Just Say No," which a lot of people not believe was completely counterproductive.


Frank has set the standard, and now most adverts in Europe are using the same format to equip the youth with unbiased facts to help in making their choices. There are still images of prison cells and hurt parents being presented in countries that have strong penalties for drugs possession. One late battle in Singapore told youthful clubbers "You play, you pay."

In the UK, the government has burned through millions on Above the Influence, a long-running movement that urges positive contrasting options to drug usage utilizing a blend of amusement and useful examples. In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. But the scare tactics is still prevalent in majority of the campaigns against drugs around the globe, especially the "descent into hell" which is drug inspired. A good example is a Canadian commercial that appeared recently and formed part of the DrugsNot4Me series in which a beautiful, self-assured young woman changes into a trembling, hollow-eyed skeleton because of "drugs".

Inquire about into a UK anti-drugs movements in the vicinity of 1999 and 2004 proposes promotions demonstrating the antagonistic impacts of medication mishandle can regularly empower youngsters "on the edges of society" to explore different avenues regarding drugs.


Frank made brand new ground - and received a lot of criticism from the conservative opposition politicians at that time - for being brave enough to put forward that substances might provide highs and lows.


Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world was one of its preliminary ads online.

It was not generally simple to get the balance of the message accurate. The man in arrears the cocaine advertisement, Matt Powell, then creative director of digital agency Profero, now disbelieves he overvalued the focus span of the ordinary web browser. The negative effects were given at the end of the animated ad and some viewers might not have watched the whole thing. Establishing the integrity of the Frank brand by telling the youth the truth about drugs and their effects was the ultimate aim of the ad, Powell states.

One survey said that 67 percent of young people would call Frank if they needed advice about drugs. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. The argument is that this is proof that the approach is working.

However, just like every other anti-drugs campaign in the world , there's no evidence that Frank has actually stopped people from taking drugs.

During the decade that the Frank campaign was introduced, drug abuse figures in the UK have reduced by 9%; however, much of the decline has been attributed to a reduction in the use of cannabis as the more youth shun smoking tobacco.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national service that offers drug education and was formed in 2003 by the Department of Health in partnership with Home Office of the British government. It's supposed to reduce the use of illegal and legal substances by teaching teens about the possible effects of alcohol and drugs. Several media campaigns on the web and on radio have been put out by this programme.


Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



Services

Available services at FRANK for those who seek help about drugs include

  • A dedicated website
  • 24/7 anonymous telephone number
  • Email
  • An anonymous live chat every afternoon 2-6pm
  • A service to locate counselling and treatment