Alcoholics Anonymous For Alcohol Addicts support-groups

The Founding Of Alcoholics Anonymous


Continuously providing help and support to alcoholic addicted persons for 80 years is what Alcoholic Anonymous (AA) does best. Founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith (who both were recovering alcoholics), Alcoholics Anonymous were started as a community fellowship for recovering alcoholics to encourage them to stay sober. The two founders compiled the twelve steps to direct AA meetings; later they introduced the 12 traditions to help better define the aims of the group. The original 12 steps are still intact; besides, many former alcohol addicts contribute to the group by helping the members make steps to recovery.


There are over 50,000 recovering alcoholics that are part of Alcoholics Anonymous group in the country and over 2 million around the globe.


What You Will Find At An AA Meeting

Arriving at the decision to go to an AA meeting can be scary and very uncomfortable, especially for people who don't realise what to expect from it. Opening up about your condition to people that you have just met is always the hard part for the new members. This feeling is felt by most of the people you'll encounter in the meetings. The original model is still in use today and it helps that the organisation was started by recovering alcoholics who understood the challenge. For recovering alcoholics, AA provides a special environment where they can open up and not feel judged because every person involved was an alcoholic at some point.


The reception to the AA meeting is always amazing. New attendees are encouraged to join the discussion, but it is not required. This is because it takes time for one to build trust so they can open up to strangers. As time passes by most attendees become comfortable with the great healing and therapy, they receive through the open and honest discussions which are provided by these meetings.


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Difference Between Closed And Open Meetings

Only recovering alcoholics or those trying to get on the path to recovery are allowed to attend closed AA meetings.

Open meetings welcome also spouses, friends, and family members of the addicts. You have the option of deciding whether you want to attend a closed meeting or an open meeting depending on your comfort level within the organisation. A certain share of the people attending these meetings prefer to keep their therapy separated from the rest of their lives. For others, the love and support of friends and family members during meetings is important.


The 12 Stages

These 12 Steps have been the backbone of the AA meetings. It involves following one stage t the next throughout the whole recovery process. If a recovering user hasn't successfully passed through a given step, they can revisit it until they are okay with their efforts.

Accepting the fact that you are suffering from alcoholism is usually the first stage you go through. Following steps are consciously deciding you want to stop the habit; accepting your wrongs and those others did to you; correcting your mistakes; committing to keep on the road to recovery. More on the 12 steps can be found here


AA Resistance

Withdrawal symptoms and other uncomfortable things one goes through as they try to quit alcohol abuse discourage many from attending the AA meetings. Most of the times, people avoid these meetings because

  • They doubt that attending the meeting will help
  • They are afraid to see someone they know at the meeting
  • They do not accept they have a problem

These arguments may seem meaningful to somebody who is already in doubt about attending a meeting; however, you should keep in mind why you were considering going there in the first place.

If you think you need help, most likely you do. Alcoholism can cause you many years of misery and in the long run you'll realise just how much attending these meetings may save you from.


AA Groups Near You

The AA groups are widespread everywhere and you will definitely find one near you. There is usually a schedule of meetings for each group; it is best to join as soon as you can. We can help you identify the AA meetings near your location and you can choose the type of meeting you want to attend. Let us provide you the help to find an AA group today please contact 0800 246 1509.